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The journal of Export Controls and Sanctions.

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Sanctions in Europe
Sanctions in Europe
Published February 2020 264 pages; includes introduction to the EU sanctions framework plus detail on to the national regimes of all EU member countries + Norway and Switzerland. For information, click here.
Price: £150.00
The CFIUS Book (2nd edition) NEW!
The CFIUS Book (2nd edition) NEW!
The CFIUS Book is the guide on how to navigate an investment or acquisition in sensitive industries or companies in the US, past the bureaucratic obstacles and hidden pitfalls to a successful conclusion. This 2nd edition (152 pages) is updated to follow implementation of the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act FIRRMA. (2nd edition published May 2020) For information, click here.
Price: £120.00
Dual-use export controls in international transit and transhipment
Dual-use export controls in international transit and transhipment
Dual-Use Export Controls in International Transit and Transhipment provides guidance on the regulations governing different types of carriage in more than 40 countries worldwide. For information, click here.
Price: £85.00
The Export Compliance Manager's Handbook (2nd Edition)
The Export Compliance Manager's Handbook (2nd Edition)
Expanded and updated. The Export Compliance Manager's Handbook is essential reading for all professionals working in this busy and demanding area of compliance. For information, click here.
Price: £65.00
Dual-use export controls of the European Union
Dual-use export controls of the European Union
Dual-use Export Controls of the European Union provides essential guidance to the regulations governing the export of dual-use items from the EU and its Member States. For information, click here.
Price: £85.00

In the heat of battle against the coronavirus pandemic, the United States may have violated its own sanctions by purchasing ventilators and other protective gear from Russia, Russian and US media reports have suggested.

‘Footage of the controversial cargo during unloading in New York showed boxes of ventilators made by a subsidiary of Russian tech firm KRET, itself a subsidiary of sanctioned state-run conglomerate Rostec,’ the Moscow Times said in its 3 April edition. ‘Western sanctions block KRET and its subsidiaries from U.S. markets unless the U.S. Office for Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) issues a waiver,’ it reported.

OFAC can always issue a specific licence for a transaction involving a sanctioned party, the Treasury Department’s former senior sanctions adviser Brian O’Toole told RBC, a Moscow-based Russian media organisation. ‘But the Trump administration might have not issued any license,’ he was quoted as saying.

O’Toole said Russia’s state-owned Russian Direct Investment Fund (‘RDIF’), which is subject to less severe US sanctions, may have stepped in to avoid violating US sanctions. RDIF said it paid half the costs of the Russian supplies after initial confusion over the terms of the deal. ‘This still should be considered a formal violation of sanctions,’ O’Toole was quoted as saying.

The US State Department said it bought the entire planeload of the medical equipment. Russia’s Foreign Ministry later said the US had paid for half the cargo, while Russia donated the other half.

Meanwhile, the US State Department said the ventilators and protective gear were purchased following a telephone call between President Trump and his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin.

‘Both countries have provided humanitarian assistance to each other in times of crisis in the past and will no doubt do so again in the future.  This is a time to work together to overcome a common enemy that threatens the lives of all of us,’ the State Department said.

Both Rostec and KRET have been sanctioned by the US government since 2014.  Rostec’s chief executive officers are also included on the blacklist.

https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2020/04/03/did-russias-coronavirus-supplies-to-the-us-violate-sanctions-a69858

https://www.rbc.ru/politics/03/04/2020/5e8617ef9a794717ba5653ff

The WorldECR Export Controls and Sanctions Forum

Trade controls are continually moving. An export that is compliant today may not be compliant tomorrow. A party – individual or business – you can contract with today may be sanctioned tomorrow. Knowledge of ‘the big picture’ in trade controls is essential.

The WorldECR Forum in London and Washington, DC, brings together export controls and sanctions compliance professionals, regulators and representatives of the multilateral control regimes, leading trade regulation attorneys and consultants, along with thought-leaders in a supportive, stimulating environment, sharing experience, insight, and knowledge of topical trade control developments and trends.

Taking place once a year in both London and DC, the WorldECR Forum has – since 2013 – been at the heart of WorldECR’s dynamic community of trade regulation professionals.

For all information, contact mark.cusick@worldecr.com

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The WorldECR Export Controls and Sanctions Forum

The WorldECR Forum in London and Washington, DC, brings together export controls and sanctions compliance professionals, regulators and representatives of the multilateral control regimes, leading trade regulation attorneys and consultants, along with thought-leaders in a supportive, stimulating environment, sharing experience, insight, and knowledge of topical trade control developments and trends.

Taking place once a year in both London and DC, the WorldECR Forum has – since 2013 – been at the heart of WorldECR’s dynamic community of trade regulation professionals.

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